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The Boomer Bulletin - 2013
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The Do’s and Don’ts of Job Seeking

Posted By Tina Greim, Tuesday, December 17, 2013

In a job market that is very competitive, at any level, it is important to have your "A” game on at all times.  This starts from the time you apply for a position, to follow up phone conversations that may lead to a face-to-face interview.  Most importantly, you are selling your brand.  Your brand isn’t just communicated by what you put in your resume, but it ties directly to any personal communication you have during the hiring process whether by phone, email or face-to-face. 

When you are searching for a new job with a new employer, you are seeking a new position for a reason.  You are out to offer that potential new employer something great.  Focus on communicating appropriately how you will add value to the company and what makes you the best candidate.  Here are some tips to think about during your job seeking process.  

Pay attention to details

When looking at an ad for a job, it’s important to submit what is specifically asked, even if you feel it is irrelevant.  If asked for a cover letter, resume and references, submit all three items.  It could cost you to be overlooked by those who submitted what was requested.  It shows lack of following directions and follow-through. As you continue to move forward into the hiring process, it’s extremely important to pay attention to details regarding timeframe for interviews and decision dates.  Most importantly, keep track of your scheduled interview times and who you will be meeting with throughout the process.  

Learn about the company, and be prepared

The web provides so much information at your fingertips.  With that being said, you should never show up to a phone or face-to-face interview unprepared regarding knowledge about the company you are interviewing with. Taking the time to research and prepare yourself will set you apart from the rest of the candidates. Doing so will allow you to ask more of the "right” questions and appear more engaged.   Just remember, you might be the most qualified, but you will most likely strikeout if you are the least prepared. 

Treat everyone with respect

Be respectful to whomever you may come in contact with during the hiring process.  This is tied directly to any individual who may contact you to schedule a phone interview to the individuals who are making the hiring decision.  Every company, depending on its size, has a different hiring process.  First impressions are first impressions and could be your last impression.  Levitt.swlearing.com states that job candidates strike out because of professional etiquette errors.  Employers believe the way you treat them reflects on how you will interact and treat their clients and other employees.  Culture is important, each person you come in contact with may be critiquing you throughout the process by the way you communicate and interact and determining if the company’s culture is right for you.  Also keep in mind, you may never know who might be a part of the interview/hiring process.  

Never come across inconvenienced

Applying for a new job takes time and there is time commitment involved.  The New York Times states that the duration of the interview process for companies like Starbucks, General Mills and Southwest Airlines have doubled since 2010.   About.com states that the one or two interviews prior to getting a job offer no longer exists and now job seekers can see up to 3 to 4 interviews or possibly 6.  This may not always work around your schedule, but you must come in with the attitude of expecting to be inconvenienced.  Companies are busy, and most likely internally, there are specific dates and times that work best to schedule phone interviews and face-to-face interviews.   It is important to appear available and never inconvenienced, even if you are.  

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